What is the Federal SSI Income Limit?

Every year, more than 600,000 people across New York receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. For these people, and millions more around the country, Supplemental Security Income represents an important benefit that helps them to cover their expenses and keep a roof over their heads. However, SSI is subject to an income limit, and it is not as easy as it sounds to determine whether someone has reached that limit.

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What Does it Legally Mean to Have a Disability?

If you want to apply for disability benefits through the Social Security Administration (SSA), first you need to be legally disabled. Otherwise, you will not be able to qualify for benefits under either Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). But what does it mean to have a disability, in the legal sense, and how does that impact your ability to get SSDI or SSI benefits? Continue reading “What Does it Legally Mean to Have a Disability?”

SSI: Five Things You Need to Know

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is one of the two primary programs administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) that provide benefits for people with disabilities. However, even many people who apply for the program do not know much about it and do not know what to expect. Here are five important things you need to know about SSI: Continue reading “SSI: Five Things You Need to Know”

Obtaining Work Credits for Social Security Disability Insurance

If you are applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) through the Social Security Administration (SSA), chances are that you have heard the term “work credits” before. This is because applying for SSDI benefits requires meeting two primary criteria: having a verifiable disability that prevents you from working and amassing sufficient work credits. But what are work credits, and how do you obtain enough to qualify for SSDI? Continue reading “Obtaining Work Credits for Social Security Disability Insurance”

When Should You Consider Applying for Social Security Disability?

When Should You Consider Applying for Social Security Disability?

Social Security Disability Insurance (or SSDI, for short) is a government program that provides monetary support for people who suffer from a disability that prevents them from working. Millions of Americans claim disability benefits through SSDI every year, although not every person with a disability has it, or necessarily qualifies for it. So how do you know if you should apply for Social Security Disability Insurance? Continue reading “When Should You Consider Applying for Social Security Disability?”

What is Supplemental Security Income (SSI)?

There are millions of people who receive benefits from Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) every year, and more people who apply every year. However, applying for SSDI means meeting certain basic requirements, and unfortunately, not everyone does. For those who can’t get SSDI, there is another program called Supplemental Security Income (SSI) which can potentially meet their needs. Continue reading “What is Supplemental Security Income (SSI)?”

What is the COLA?

Social Security can often seem somewhat opaque to people, since it’s not entirely clear how they determine how much you get paid. This is doubly true for things like Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), two programs intended to help those who can no longer work due to a mental or physical disability. One of the things that can have an impact on how much you receive is the Cost of Living Adjustment, or COLA for short. Continue reading “What is the COLA?”

Should Your Social Media Activity Determine Your Eligibility for SSD Benefits?

CBS News reported that the Social Security Administration (SSA) may view the social media posts of Social Security Disability claimants in an effort to crack down on fraud. The agency also announced that, as part of the 2020 budget, it is expanding its review process for those applying for SSD.
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Social Security Administration Reinstates “Reconsideration” Stage

Unfortunately, recent data shows that approximately 66 percent of initial applications for social security disability are denied.  That number is slightly lower for individuals who file with an attorney. Following a denied claim, the wait process can be draining.

For years, New York was one of several states which did not have a “reconsideration stage” and instead would skip right to a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).  Once a denial was issued, the individual would have the ability to request a hearing before an adjudicative law judge.  The wait time for a hearing in New York is between one and two years.  Once the hearing is scheduled, the individual and a vocational expert appear before a judge where they review the claim and medical evidence.
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More Disabled People Opt to Collect Paychecks, Not Benefits

A recent article in The Wall Street Journal reported that a record number of people with mental and physical disabilities joined the workforce while, at the same time, stopped receiving disability benefits.

According to the WSJ, 51,302 people went off disability so they can find “gainful” employment; that is the most since 2002. Meanwhile, 8.5 million people are still collecting disability in December 2018, down from 9 million the same month four years ago.
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