What Does it Mean to Be 100 Percent Disabled According to the VA?

If you are a disabled veteran and have undergone an assessment for your disability status, then you have likely been assigned a number representing what “percent” disabled you are. This number is crucial for determining the amount of benefits you receive from the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA), including the amount of compensation you receive each month. But what does it mean to be one hundred percent disabled, or any other percent, and how do they come to that determination?

Whenever someone is injured or becomes ill while serving in the United States military, or they subsequently suffer an illness related to their service, they can apply for disability benefits through the VA. As part of the application process, the VA evaluates applicants to determine both the severity of their disability and the extent to which that disability can be tied back to their military service. They are then assigned a certain “percent” disabled, rounded off to the nearest 10%.

In effect, the higher the percentage of your disability, the more severe your condition is determined to be. If you have multiple disabilities, they will be added together to determine your total disability for the purposes of benefits. This is intended to reflect the notion that people with higher disability ratings are those who will have a greater difficulty working for a living, with those at 100% disability considered to have conditions that make working for a living essentially impossible. That said, if you are already seeking disability benefits through the VA, it can be helpful to have someone advocating for you to maximize the benefits you receive.

The attorneys of Sullivan & Kehoe place a special focus on assisting disabled veterans. Our veterans’ disability lawyers are still available for remote consultation on your legal issues. Call our office at (800) 395-7830 to schedule a consultation in our New York City, Garden City, Kings Park, Riverhead, or White Plains office, or visit our contact page.

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